The best local cherry blossom locations in Tokyo!

Where can you observe Sakura trees and have a Hanami picnic in Tokyo?
We will introduce famous location for cherry blossoms and spots recommended by Tadaima Japan’s local Tokyo staff members.

2017-04-21   Seasonal, Travel Destinations, Tokyo,

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【 CONTENTS 】

Where can you observe Sakura trees and have a Hanami picnic in Tokyo?
We will introduce famous location for cherry blossoms and spots recommended by Tadiama Japan’s local Tokyo staff members.

For those would like to check out Cherry Blossom Cruises along Sumida River and other unique experience, please see this link.

The Map of Tokyo below shows each location. Click on the numbers and you will find the address and travel information.

Popular Sakura spots

The icons below each location indicate the following:
Photogenic: Evening Lighting: ☆ Food stalls: Admission Fee:¥

①Ueno Park

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ueno_park

Ueno park is where important cultural institutions of Japan gather and is a famous Hanami location. TV News programs report on the amount of people every Sakura season. The park has a very festive mood, because a lot of excited people gather together for Hanami. The lighting event is from 5.30pm to 8pm during the Sakura festival.

②Chidorigafuchi

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chidorigafuchi
Chidorigafuchi is a path alongside the north west part of the outer banks of the Imperial palace. The beautiful mature cherry trees cover the pathway. Walking under the cherry blossoms is like passing through a Sakura tunnel. Boat rides are also available. One million people visit during the season every year.

③Shinjuku-Gyoen park

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shinjuku-gyoen
Shinjuku-Gyoen park is accessible on foot from Shinjuku station. The park covers a large area of Shinjuku, so there is plenty of walking room. The park is also relatively peaceful and family friendly, and alcoholic beverages are not allowed. This would be the best place to have a daytime picnic. The park has many other types of late blooming cherry trees, allowing for 3 more weeks of blooming cherry trees after the regular season.

❀Information

  • Open hours:9am-4:30pm *Last admission 4pm
  • Dates:From 25th March to 24th April, Open everyday (Regular holidays are on Mondays)
  • Admission fee:Adult 200yen, Junior High and Elementary school children 50 yen

 

④Meguro riverside

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meguroriver

Megurogawa Riverside’s Sakura street is famous for evening lighting. The lantern lights reflected on the river create a fantastic atmosphere. There are many restaurants along the street, so food and drinks offered by the shops will satisfy your stomach. Lighting is 6pm-9pm (as of 2016).

⑤A former feudal load’s garden, Rikugien Gardens


rikugien
Rikugien is a Japanese garden with a huge weeping cherry tree. The weeping cherry tree is mysteriously beautiful, especially during the evening. This is such an outstanding tree and a lot of people observe it. Hanami parties are not allowed at the park, so everyone has a chance to see this tree. Lighting is scheduled after sunset until 9pm

❀Information

  • Open hours:9am-9pm during the Sakura event from 16th Mar to 2nd Apr
    *Last admission 8:30pm
  • Admission fee:Adult 300yen, Children under Elementary grade level are free

⑥Yanaka Cemetery

yanaka
Photos credit: Taito ward

The Yanaka Cemetery has a beautiful cherry blossom street. The tree branches transform the street into a beautiful tunnel of blooming cherry blossoms. You’ll also find a cemetery with over 7000 graves in this area. The grave of the last shogun Yoshinobu Tokugawa is located here.

❀Information

  • Open Hours:8:30am-5:15pm

Tadaima Japan staff recommendations!

Many Japanese people may have their own memorable Sakura spots. As spring is both the beginning of school and the beginning for new employee recruits, Sakura trees trigger such special occasions. Let’s look at recommended spots from TJ’s local Tokyo staff.

⑦Mizumoto park

mizumoto-park_tokyo-metropolitan-park-association
Photos credit: Tokyo Metropolitan Park Association

Mizumoto Park is located in the northeast end of the Tokyo suburbs. This is one of the largest parks owned and operated by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government. A river flows through the center of the park and many trees and plants, including many cherry blossom trees, are able to be seen.

⑧Sarue Onshi park

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Photos credit: Sarue Onshi park

Sarue-Onshi Park (a 30 to 40-minute walk from the Tokyo sky tree) has a nice and cozy lawn with Cherry blossom trees. It spreads out around the clock tower in the middle of the park and cherry trees are planted on both sides. This is a great place to relax and have a quiet picnic. This park was the stock yard for timbers during the Edo period.

⑨Johoku-Chuo Park

Johoku-Chuo park
Johoku-Chuo park(Photos courtesy of Tokyo Metropolitan Park Association)
Shakujii River
Shakujii River (Photos courtesy of Itabashi City Office)

It is a largest park in the north of Tokyo. There are about 9,000 different types of trees, including cherry trees, Japanese Zelkova, and ginkgo. You can see cherry trees at various places in the park during spring. There are some open areas where you can enjoy a picnic and lie on the grass. I recommend that you get off at the Nakaitabashi Station on Tobu Tojo Line and go to the park alongside Shakujii River, because the rows of cherry trees alongside the river are spectacular.

yotsuya

The line of cherry trees between JR Idabashi station and JR Yotsuya station is very impressive. Sakura trees are observbable from the JR Chuō line trains, around the pier of Idabashi, and alongside the bankside thoughout Yotsuya. Getting off at the Yotsuya station, you will see the cherry trees on the Yotsuya bank. Viewing Shinjuku city over the cherry trees is superb.

During Sakura season, cherry blossoms are everywhere in Tokyo. We hope you will find a special place where you’ll want visit again and again. Find the Sakura Forecast 2017 at: tadaimajp.com/2017/02/sakura-forecast-2017.

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AUTHOR

Kumo

Writer / Translator

I love travelling and tourists! Where to next? Wherever it is, I hope to find a good onsen (hot spring bath), delicious drinks, and friendly people. I enjoy telling Japanese stories in English, and it fills my life with plenty of learning opportunities!